Emaus

Emaus

The Emmaus indulgence taking place on the second day of Easter owes its name to the evangelical town, to which Jesus went after his resurrection. Some historians and ethnographers trace Emmaus' lineage, similarly to the hill Rękawka, in pagan traditions, while others explain it by the need to exercise in people who eat up after Christmas. On the day of the indulgence, the vicinity of the Norbertine convent was filled with stalls with sweets, toys and other accessories necessary for such occasions. Even at the end of the 19th century, an "obligatory" purchase on Emaus was a hatchet and a clay bell. In addition to the speed-dyngus pouring water, corkscrews were passionately fired and firecrackers were fired. Mainly young people took part in the Emmaus, students and a suburban folk.

A long time ago in the church of Salvator there was a valuable crucifix sent to the first Christian prince from Moravia. Christ of the crucifix was dressed in precious garments, a crown was put on his head, and gold shoes on the feet, studded with precious stones. Once upon a time, a poor musician, kneeling down before the crucifix, he started playing the violin. Christ, moved by his beautiful game, but also great poverty, he slipped off one of the shoes and gave it to the musician. However, the faithful seated the poor man for theft and took his precious shoe from him, they put it back on Christ's foot. Then history repeated itself, this time in front of the crowd, but no one dared to take away the gift from the poor violinist anymore.